Author:
• Friday, February 14th, 2014

chautona-card41I’d suspect it would say something like this.

I used this “Each Minute” stamp from Our Daily Bread Designs and a bunch of scrap paper (woohoo!  Wouldn’t Willow be proud!) and made a VERY simple (read: super fast) card.  :)

I also have a stamp of a girl named Willow (no joke) writing a “recipe” but it looks like she’s writing in her journal to me.  I think I need to combine the two into one very “Willow” card.

What a wonderful way to celebrate the release of HearthLand Episode 1!!!

 

Category: Craft Ideas  | 2 Comments
Author:
• Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

Lavender florets sprinkled in to the top of melted tallow and rehardened, makes a lovely lavender scented candle.  I’m enjoying it as I type.

I am SO excited!

Category: Craft Ideas  | 2 Comments
Author:
• Monday, January 27th, 2014

I’m calling these “Fat-Free” because the fat I used to make them was… you guessed it!  FREE!

I finally have the results on the candle making process.  I will never become a chandler, but I may make these more than once, actually.  It was quite fun, and I have my preferred methods already!  WOOT.

First, my supplies: candles1

We have here, 10 lbs of hard beef fat.  As I said, I got this free from my grocery store (I expected to pay for it as I had to order it, but it arrived with a lovely N/C written across the top of the plastic.  WOOT!

Also needed:

  • A large container to melt the fat in (I used a Dutch Oven, but people use stock pots, crock pots (I’ll get to that later) and regular sauce pans to render their fat.
  • Jars or containers for the candles.  I did both the little mini jelly jars and the pretty blue vintage ones–for fun.
  • Cheesecloth (to strain the fat.  YOU WANT TO DO THIS!)
  • Cotton string or twine for wicks (Braid it for the fatter candles)
  • Bolt nuts (to keep the wick at the bottom of the jar.

That’s it!  That’s all it takes.  Now there are LOTS of ways people suggest to render the fat.  So, I tried several of the most popular looking ones.  I started with just putting fat in the Dutch oven and covering it with water. I knew it would work best if I trimmed off the meat stuff and cut it small, but I wanted to really see how different things would work, so I tried it right out of the package.

candles2

As you can see, there is still a lot of meat on that fat.

candles3

Ready to boil!  It took quite a while to melt this fat.  It was really nice to do it this way because the water kept the fat from becoming too hot.  I could go do other things, come back, stir, mash with a potato masher, go away again, and repeat.  The disadvantages were that it took MUCH longer to do it this way and I don’t think it got out all the fat it could have.  I think there was more waste this way.

Anyway, after this, I took all the leftovers, strained ‘em, and put them in the crockpot overnight.  Just let it keep melting that fat.  Meanwhile, I strained the liquid I had from this a couple of times and then set it outside.  The fat solidified and rose to the top.  The water and meat pieces fell to the bottom.  Our dog loved it over his bowl of dog food.  See:

Okay, so that was taken several years ago. Isn’t my granddaughter cute? Yeah, Sergeant is too. I just thought that tongue says it all!

The crockpot method is also very nice in the “dump it and leave it department.  It also smells a lot better. My eldest came in the house the next morning and said, “Mmm… what’s for dinner?”  We all gagged.  LOL.  It did get a LOT more rendered fat out of the leftovers from batch one.

candles4

This is what it looked like when I took the time to cut off the excess meat (or most of it) from the fat.  Sergeant liked that too.  And can I just say it is WEIRD to be trimming MEAT from FAT instead of the other way around?  When Laura claimed that Ma Ingalls used every single piece of that pig, she wasn’t joking!

This time I just put it in the Dutch oven, turned it on and stirred.  And stirred.  And stirred.  Now this is how I’d always pictured Willow doing it.  I mean, I figured they were rendering the tallow while organizing the beef when their meat arrived each time.  Then freeze it into bricks and melt again to strain it a couple more times before doing the candling–just get the big stuff off first and all.  Well, it doesn’t take long for the fat to melt.  In that regard, this is the fastest way.  I’d say I stirred for an hour tops.  I think I could have cut that–maybe even in half–but I was paranoid about overheating the oil.  I’m a rookie.  What can I say?

Then again, it sat to harden.  I melted it again.  Strained it again.  And let it harden.  Again.  These melts were FAST.  I mean, ten minutes or so maybe.  While it melted (and you do have to stir) I got ready for the pour process.  WOOHOO!

candles5

Now here’s the nuts and bolts of it… *ducks*.  I just tied a string to those nuts (nice and long so there would be no problem with it) and set aside.  I did twelve like this–one for each little jar.

candles6

Works great–kind of like fishing weights.  Just keeps that wick at the bottom.  Then what I did was to set up my wick rod.  I’d imagined Kari building these neat things out of wood.  Just use a block on the bottom, dowel rods going up each side, and one long dowel rod across the top.  I figured screw eyes in the end of the side dowels would allow the top dowel to slide through and sit there nicely.  And I almost made one.  Then I thought, “What if I hate this and never do it again?  What would Willow do?”  I glanced around my house and my eyes landed on my front door–with the “temporary” (it’s 12 years old now) curtain hanging from a … MAGNETIC ROD.  WOOT.  Genius.  I didn’t get a GOOD picture of what I used, so here’s one from Amazon.  Because I think it’s cool.

Image courtesy of Amazon as I said.

Those end pieces are magnetic!  So I just laid it down atop some cans of beans and veggies and voila!  Had my little wick stick and without any cost at all!

candles7

See!  All ready to go!  Just pour (carefully… it’s HOT) and voila!

candles8

I think it’s fascinating how the oil is so yellow and turns into white again.  Okay, look closely at that picture.  See the nuts on the edges of the jars?  Once I got done pouring, I just scooted the jars and wick strings around until they were reasonably centered.  Voila!  Wicked candles.  I poured 10 of these.  Still had TONS of melted tallow.  So… I went for the BIG GUNS

candles9

I wish I could tell you why there’s a piece of cardstock back there.  I really do.  Clueless.  It was late.  That’s all I’ve got for you.  LOL.  Anyway, I needed more space for stuff to work–hang and all, so I tied some wicks to my cabinet door handles and put the bigger jars below it… like this.  I had 4 of these!

candles10

Looks like lemonade in those jars, doesn’t it?  Weird, right?  At this point, things got interesting.  You see, I had cabinet doors (like to where the dishes are and the cold cereal boxes–minor things like that)  sitting there unmovable.  If someone came stumbling in for breakfast and didn’t pay attention, we could have a mess.  So I did what any good chandler would do.  At midnight in the middle of January in the desert (read: it’s cold out there!), I opened the doors and windows.  Then I piled blankets on me, put on a sweater, and let my fingers type half-frozen as I worked on my current book and my tallow candles solidified.

The little ones only took about… maybe an hour?  Forty-five minutes?  Not sure because I didn’t check often.  I just sat down and got up about an hour later.  The big ones weren’t even close.  Hardly thickening.  But I cut off the wicks to the height of the jar on the little ones, put the lids on, and stuck ‘em in the fridge.  Then I carefully moved the bigger ones to the wick holder apparatus.  I snuggled back under the blankets, and sometime in the next hour or two they were solidified.  So, doors and windows closed and jars went in fridge.

My daughter took two home with her–big and little.  She called with her verdict:  “They’re going to burn for a LONG time and they do have a bit of a beef smell, but it isn’t bad.”

candles11

Last night, I finally burned mine.  I burned one of the little ones just to get a feel for it.  When you take the candles out of the fridge (I just kept ‘em in there after solidifying them all the way), there is no scent.  I can’t smell a thing.  When they burn, they crackle a bit and every once in a while, I thought I smelled a bit of beef–like beef jerky.  But it wasn’t consistent, and it might have been the open bag of beef jerky on the floor beneath it.  Snicker.

I took my little tiny candle into our bathroom to get a feel for how much light it would put out (Our living room has two lights that stay on pretty much 24/7 and are HARD to turn off, so I didn’t wanna mess with that).  I was astounded!  Now we don’t have a big bathroom–it’s a bit smaller than I imagine Willow’s to be, but not THAT much smaller.  There was PLENTY of light in there.  I could find anything I needed by just opening the cabinet door and reading.  It put off a bit more than any nightlight I’ve ever owned.  That surprised me.  I thought it would have taken two to be of any real use.  Not so!  WOOT!  Still, I wouldn’t want to do my makeup with it.  Just sayin’.

All in all, I got 10 little jars and 4 big ones out of 10 lbs of hard fat scraps.  I think I must have lost at least a pound to meat and gristle.  Not too shabby for a simple experiment.  Today’s experiment is that after I melted the entire top of the candle, I snuffed it out and put lavender florets on top.  I’m letting them sink into the melted tallow and harden again.  I’m hoping tomorrow I’ll have a slightly faint scent of lavender.  If it works, it’ll be a GREAT way to add scent next time.  Just fill the jars 1/3 of the way.  Let harden.  Pour a tiny bit of melted tallow on top.  Add the lavender.  Let harden. Repeat twice, and bam.  Lavender candles!  (I know, I know.  “Essential oils!” Well, I’m doing what I think Willow and Kari would have tried, not what others can do by going to the store.  It’s a quirk of mine!)

So, there’s my lesson.  I had fun.  I think they’ll make fun gifts for friends who are crunchy enough to enjoy it!  :)

candles12

 

 

 

Author:
• Thursday, December 26th, 2013

Chad, Willow, and the children are in Westbury for a late Christmas gathering with the Tesdall-Sullivan-Stuart clan.  Chad had to work yesterday, even with the miscarriage, which I think is cruel. So they decided to enjoy their celebration today. She’s feeling better physically.  That’s part of why they went, I think.  Marianne won’t let Willow overdo it.  She’ll be forced to sit and enjoy the children.

Meanwhile, Josh and I are holding down the fort while they’re gone.  Can you believe it?  Josh milked the new goat, Guinevere.  I call her Gwenny.  He insists on her real name.  I think he only washed his hands four times afterward too.  He still won’t drink the stuff, but it’s a start.

But, the real reason for my post is that one of my gifts to Willow was a new journal–one I decorated the cover for myself.

Okay, fine.  With help from Josh.  A LOT of help then.  The idea is that she’ll put her thoughts in there for everything she wants to share on here.  Of course, sometimes I’ll be taking from the journals on the table.  That means sometimes there’ll even be entries from Kari, but I wanted one that I knew, if there was a new entry, HAD to be shared.  So, Merry Christmas (late though it may be) and I look forward to sharing stuff with you.  Josh and I are excited about upcoming changes around here and what it means for us.  We’ll share that with you as well.

December 25–

I’m ready.  This year was more rushed than I’d like.  I don’t enjoy a life of rushing and panic because plans are taking longer than expected. I have to adjust my plans and expectations to fit my reality. I can do that now that I know.  I think I am beginning to understand Mother’s feeling of constant flux in our lives.  I just followed her lead, never realizing how much change came with each year.  I must remember this as the children near adulthood–showing them the ebb and flow of life so they are more prepared than I was for it.
Aggie stopped by last week and gave me a beautiful glass dispenser.  I couldn’t figure out why I needed something like that when the faucet works fine, but I thought maybe it would be nice for lemonade or lemon water in the summer.  Then she explained her idea–laundry soap!  (Becca, maybe you can put a picture on the thing to show what it looks like?)  I love it.  Mother would have approved.  I think if glass wasn’t so fragile and expensive to ship, or too heavy to carry, she would have had something like this years ago.  It’s nice not to have to dip into the bucket and fiddle with the lid etc.  If it needs stirring, I can see it.  It’s just a lovely gift and I think them staying with us really gave her insight into what suits me best.  I’m afraid my silly throw quilt will be less unique and practical, but I know she’ll understand that it was made with love.
Becca showed Chad the blog where Aggie got the idea and now he’s obsessed with creating a new and beautiful laundry room like the one on the blog.  I had to go into town and find it at the library so I could see what she was talking about.  It’s a beautiful room, really.  I love it.  But I just don’t understand.  We’re a working farm.  We have mud,  manure, and other muckiness. My laundry room is in a barn!  Why would we try to make it more than utilitarian?  Then again, is that not what our life is about?  Living it to the fullest and infusing beauty into every corner of it?  So, our new laundry room will be both pretty and utilitarian.  And it’ll feature my lovely new dispenser!  Isn’t that just beautiful?  I’m so excited.
The contractions are stronger now.  I think it’s almost over.  Time for me to take another shower.  Chad will laugh–to prevent himself from crying again, I suspect.  That part doesn’t have to go into the blog, Becca.  You can share if you think it matters, but once I start writing, I find it hard to stay only on one topic.  I just ramble.

As you can see, she’s well enough.  We’re praying for her, of course–and Chad.  I decided to leave those thoughts and musings because it is what makes Willow, Willow.  And isn’t that what this blog is all about?  Sharing her?  I start with a laundry fun post and end with what is affecting her heart right now.

Have a wonderful day.+

Author:
• Thursday, December 26th, 2013

Wouldn’t Willow approve?  I think I’ll start her a Pinterest page.

beccasiggy

Author:
• Monday, December 23rd, 2013

If Willow had a book of quotes, each page would be illustrated and say things like this.

beccasiggy

Category: Craft Ideas  | One Comment
Author:
• Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

I got this note yesterday!

I met Josh! I couldn’t believe it.  He was standing right behind me in line at Joann’s on Saturday.  When he was there he wasn’t working and was there with his girlfriend.  However, if you would meet him while working at Joann’s [you] would possibly [assume the same thing Chad did of him] (which isn’t right as Josh demonstrated wink ).

 

So… what was Josh doing in JoAnn’s with a girlfriend?  Huh??  Huh??

wink

(psst… this was supposed to be published back on December 11, 2013

beccasiggy

• Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

Every year about this time, Mother would get me busy with something that didn’t require my brain but did require my busy hands–cookie making, chicken de-boning, coloring–and then she’d just start reciting.  I remember the first time she ever did it.  I was about five and had gotten into trouble for something.  Why can’t I remember what?  Anyway, she’d set me to separating dried beans into jars.  Mother liked our beans to be stored in Mason jars with all rocks removed so we didn’t have to take the time to do it when we cooked them.  As an added lesson to whatever it was (I suspect I made a mess that only Mother could clean up, now that I think of it), she combined pinto beans, white navy beans, and split peas for me to separate into jars and from the rocks and rotten pieces.  I was discouraged and feeling a little sorry for myself.  Why Mother didn’t tell me to change my attitude and deal with it, I will never know.  Instead, she pulled out the table leaf and started mixing bread.  As she mixed, she recited.

Annie and Willie’s Prayer

‘Twas the eve before Christmas. “Good night,” had been said,
And Annie and Willie had crept into bed;
There were tears on their pillows, and tears in their eyes,
And each little bosom was heaving with sighs,
For tonight their stern father’s command had been given
That they should retire precisely at seven
Instead of at eight-for they troubled him more
With questions unheard of than ever before:
He had told them he thought this delusion a sin,
No such creature as “Santa Claus” ever had been.
And he hoped, after this, he should never more hear
How he scrambled down chimneys with presents each year.
And this was the reason that two little heads
So restlessly tossed on their soft, downy beds.
Eight, nine, and the clock on the steeple tolled ten,
Not a word had been spoken by either till then,
When Willie’s sad face from the blanket did peep,
And whispered, “Dear Annie, is ‘ou fast as’eep?”
“Why no, brother Willie,” a sweet voice replies,
“I’ve long tried in vain, but I can’t shut my eyes,
For somehow it makes me so sorry because
Dear Papa has said there is no ‘Santa Claus.’
Now we know there is, and it can’t be denied,
For he came every year before Mama died;
But, then, I’ve been thinking that she used to pray,
And God would hear everything Mama would say,
And maybe she asked him to send Santa Claus here
With that sackful of presents he brought every year.”
“Well, why tan’t we p’ay dest as Mama did den,
And ask Dod to send him with p’esents aden?”
“I’ve been thinking so too,” and without a word more
Four little bare feet bounded out on the floor,
And four little knees the soft carpet pressed,
And two tiny hands were clasped close to each breast.
“Now, Willie, you know we must firmly believe
That the presents we ask for we’re sure to receive;
You must wait very still till I say the ‘Amen,’
And by that you will know that your turn has come then.”
“Dear Jesus, look down on my brother and me,
And grant us the favor we are asking of thee.
I want a wax dolly, a tea set, and ring,
And an ebony workbox that shuts with a spring.
Bless Papa, dear Jesus, and cause him to see
That Santa Claus loves us as much as does he;
Don’t let him get fretful and angry again
At dear brother Willie and Annie. Amen.”
“Please, Desus, ‘et Santa Taus turn down tonight,
And b’ing us some p’esents before it is light,
I want he should div’ me a nice ‘ittie s’ed,
With bright sbinin’ ‘unners, and all painted red;
A box full of tandy, a book, and a toy,
Amen, and then, Desus, I’ll be a dood boy.”

Their prayers being ended, they raised up their heads,
With hearts light and cheerful, again sought their beds.
They were lost soon in slumber, both peaceful and deep,
And with fairies in dreamland were roaming in sleep.

Eight, nine, and the little French clock had struck ten,
Ere the father had thought of his children again:
He seems now to hear Annie’s half-suppressed sighs,
And to see the big tears stand in Willie’s blue eyes.
“I was harsh with my darlings,” he mentally said,
“And should not have sent them so early to bed;
But then I was troubled; my feelings found vent,
For bank stock today have gone down ten per cent!

But of course they’ve forgotten their troubles ere this,
And that I denied them the thrice-asked-for kiss:
But, just to make sure, I’ll go up to their door,
For I never spoke harsh to my darlings before.”
So saying, he softly ascended the stairs,
And arrived at the door to hear both of their prayers;
His Annie’s “Bless Papa” drew forth the big tears,
And Willie’s grave promise fell sweet on his ears.
“Strange-strange-I’d forgotten,” said he with a sigh,
“How I longed when a child to have Christmas draw nigh.”
“I’ll atone for my harshness,” he inwardly said,
“By answering their prayers ere I sleep in my bed.”
Then he turned to the stairs and softly went down,
Threw off velvet slippers and silk dressing gown,
Donned hat, coat, and boots, and was out in the street,
A millionaire facing the cold, driving in the sleet!
Nor stopped he until he had bought everything
From the box full of candy to the tiny gold ring;
Indeed, he kept adding so much to his store,
That the various presents outnumbered a score.

Then homeward he turned. Where his holiday load,
With Aunt Mary’s help, in the nursery was stowed.
Miss Dolly was seated beneath a pine tree,
By the side of a table spread out for her tea;
A workbox well fitted in the center was laid,
And on it the ring for which Annie had prayed,
A soldier in uniform stood by a sled
“With bright shining runners, and all painted red.”
There were balls, dogs, and horses, books pleasing to see,
And birds of all colors were perched in the tree!
While Santa Claus, laughing, stood up in the top,
As if getting ready more presents to drop.
And as the fond father the picture surveyed,
He thought for his trouble he had amply been paid,
And he said to himself, as he brushed off a tear,
‘I’m happier tonight than I’ve been for a year;
I’ve enjoyed more pure pleasure than ever before;
What care I if bank stock falls ten per cent more!
Hereafter I’ll make it a rule, I believe,
To have Santa Claus visit us each Christmas Eve.”
So thinking, he gently extinguished the light,
And, tripping down stairs, retired for the night.

As soon as the beams of the bright morning sun
Put the darkness to flight, and the stars one by one,
Four little blue eyes out of sleep opened wide,
And at the same moment the presents espied;
Then out of their beds they sprang with a bound,
And the very gifts prayed for were all of them found.
They laughed and they cried, in their innocent glee,
And shouted for Papa to come quick and see
What presents old Santa Claus brought in the night
(just the things that they wanted,) and left before light:
“And now,” added Annie, in a voice soft and low,
“You’ll believe there’s a ‘Santa Claus’, papa, I know”-
While dear little Willie climbed up on his knee,
Determined no secret between them should be,
And told in soft whispers how Annie had said
That their dear, blessed mama, so long ago dead,
Used to kneel down by the side of her chair,
And that God up in heaven had answered her prayer.
“Den we dot up and prayed dust well as we tould,
And Dod answered our prayers: now wasn’t He dood?”
“I should say that He was, if He sent you all these,
And knew just what presents my children would please.
(Well, well, let him think so, the dear little elf,
‘Twould be cruel to tell him I did it myself.”)

Blind father! Who caused your stern heart to relent,
And the hasty words spoken so soon to repent?
‘Twas the Lord Jesus who bade you steal softly upstairs,
And made you His agent to answer their prayers.

– Sophia P. Snow

I learned later that she’d spent every night after I went to bed, memorizing the poem in order to be able to recite it to me at will.  When people hear about my childhood and some of the cultural things I still don’t understand and say, “What kind of mother did you have?” I think of things like this and say to myself, “This kind of mother.  The best I could have hoped for.”

Chad went online to find a link to the poem somewhere and found this video of a man reading it.  We thought you might enjoy it.  You can also purchase the poem from Amazon either as a single book or in the collection of poems we recommend, The Best Loved Poems of the American People by Hazel Felleman

willowsig

Author:
• Sunday, December 08th, 2013

Photo property of TwinkieChan and Etsy

Wow!  I was supposed to be keeping up this blog for Willow, but marriage has kept me pretty busy.  I hope you’ll forgive me. It’s all been a blur.  But I was at Willow’s today and I saw the strings of crocheted popcorn and thought, “People might want to get started on chains like this for next year.” So pull up a good Hallmark Christmas movie, make some hot chocolate–soft candy cane (for stirring) recipe forthcoming–and crochet as many of these as you can stand to do.  I recommend having a supply of red wooden beads to put between each one, just like Willow’s.  For the record, she’s a fan of the “popcorn, popcorn, cranberry” organizational flow.

I recommend THIS PATTERN from Etsy seller, TwinkieChan.  Aren’t they pretty?

beccasiggy

Category: Craft Ideas  | One Comment
Author:
• Monday, July 15th, 2013
So here are the ingredients:  A cloth, some cotton balls, and a rubber band.

So here are the ingredients: A cloth, some cotton balls, and a rubber band.

So, well it’s been a week since I started using this deodorant and I’ve got updates for you! First, I want to show you how I made the “applicator.”

It’s simple.  I feel stupid for doing pictures, but you know, sometimes people just need a visual, so I’m going to do it anyway.

I didn’t want to take the time to go to Wal-Mart and buy a “nice” washcloth because I’m lazy.  So, while I was grabbing some groceries, I saw the “cleaning aisle” and went down it.  If they had some, I’d buy it.  If not, then I’d do the Wal-Mart thing.  Well, they had some.  I paid too much for them, but it saved me a trip to the other side of town, so hey.

Once I got home, I took one and rinsed it out with a bit of soap in it.  When the water ran clear, then I just hung it outside to dry.  This is the desert.  By the time I was done petting the dog, not long because it’s HOT out there, I grabbed it and brought it in.  It was dry.  Oy.

I used a full handful of cotton balls.  Big ones.

I just set them in the center of the washcloth.

I grabbed each corner and the center of each side and held them in one hand while I use the other to wrap the rubber band around the  top of the bunch like a pony tail.

Voila.  Done.  It’s that simple.

See... not that many.  Maybe 10?

See… not that many. Maybe 10?

Isn't it cute?

Isn’t it cute?

It just sits in the jar!  Perfect.

It just sits in the jar! Perfect.

deodorant14

See! That’s all it takes!

Now, for the real question.  Does it work?

I’ll be honest.  I didn’t think it would.  I thought I’d feel damp all day and I’d stink.  But I gave it a fair shot and I took a shower.  I chose a navy shirt and navy workout pants because I wanted to give it every chance to fail (I’m not very nice).

First, I have to say that it FEELS GREAT.  I’ve never felt so clean after putting on any kind of deodorant.  I use Arrid X-tra Dry aerosol.  ALWAYs.  I flip between the blue and yellow cans because if I don’t, it stops working.  I like aerosol because I prefer the dry feeling of it. So this part of it was amazing.  The powder DID dust off onto my pants and my shirt.  I thought, “Great.  Just what I needed.”

Guess what?  Unlike Arrid, when I dusted it off, it just came right off.  Took a second with a dry towel to rub it right off.  FAST.  After a time or two, I learned to do it by leaning over the tub.  With that, I got nothing on my dark clothes.  That said, there IS white inside my clothes.  It washes right out and no under arm stains so far.

I stayed dry all day.  I didn’t stink.  I even didn’t let myself take  a shower on day two to see how that worked out for me.  I still didn’t stink.  SHOCKER.  I really thought it would be gross.

Furthermore, we had high humidity the first 3 days of use.  Considering we cool our house with a swamp cooler, that means that we added humidity to our high humidity and usually I would have been sticky, stinky, and gross by the end of the day.  I wasn’t.  I’m still astounded.

Will I use this all the time?  Probably not, but I will use it MOST of the time.  I’m not taking it on vacation. Maybe someday, but right now, no way.

Now the only question remains:  how long will this last?  I spent about 5.00 making the deodorant.  I’m not including the cost of the applicator because I figure that’s optional and because it is “non-consumable.”

So, I’m curious to see if anyone else tries it and if it works for them.  I’m sending a baggie for my friend Christy.  We’ll see how it works for her in a climate closer to Willow’s.  :)